Tag Archives: Loan Modification

Gmac Loan Modification Calculator Find Out Your New Monthly Payment

Gmac Loan Modification Calculator Find Out Your New Monthly Payment

If you need a GMAC loan modification, you might want to check out a website and see if you qualify. They have a loan modification calculator that will tell you if you qualify and what your new payment would be once approved.

This calculator is based off Obama’s HAM program. It caps your monthly mortgage payment at 31% of your net monthly income. This is accomplished by lowering your interest rate to as low as 2%, extending the terms of your loan and reducing your principal balance. It goes in this order, so usually the payment cap is met before a reduction of principal is necessary.

This is an amazing program for those who qualify. The problem is, less than 300,000 homeowners have received a loan modification under these guidelines out of the millions and millions of homeowners who are in desperate need of one.

Some homeowners call the lenders themselves and some of them even received notices in the mail from their lender saying they were qualified. Once they get on the phone, they soon realize they are denied and are left scratching their heads!

The main reason for this is usually the financial ratios homeowners are giving their lender. You can’t just call your lender without working out your financials first! They will ask you a series of questions and if you do not anwer them correctly, you will be denied for sure. You cannot make too much money or too little either. Your income to expenses have to be just right to get approved for this plan.

Don’t worry, there is help available. Try out the calculator and see if you qualify and what your payment will be. If you want help to get that payment, just fill out the form for a free consultation if you’d like. They will be able to give you a free consultation and tell you how they can help you get approved. There are no upfront fees.

To see if you qualify for a GMAC loan modification, just visit the following links.

Loan Modification Alert Countrywide tightens Loan Modification

Loan Modification Alert Countrywide tightens Loan Modification

Home Loan Modification allows defaulting borrowers to work out new terms with Countrywide, so that they can avoid foreclosure and stay on track. Countrywide began offering the service through their Home Retention Department at the height of last year’s real estate bubble. However, due to the volume of requests coming in, many cases were delayed and resulted in foreclosure. The company hit an all-time low in 2008 and was recently bought out by the Bank of America.

In line with the change, the Loan Modification Department of the Law Offices of Marc R. Tow is also taking measures to protect its clients. The firm, one of the leading loan modification services in the country, will only negotiate modifications with Countrywide for clients with viable cases and those who are in serious financial trouble. Changes are also expected in national Loan Modification policies. While loan modification is still open to borrowers not in default, new laws may soon limit the service only to those in bankruptcy or serious delinquency. This will allow lenders and loan modification companies to focus their attention to clients who are most in need. The firm will continue to help clients with loans serviced by other companies. Besides loan modification, the Law Offices of Marc R. Tow also offers assistance with loss mitigation alternatives such as short sales.”>Homeowners hoping to get a loan modification with Countrywide may want to rethink their options. Countrywide Financial, best known for excessive lending practices that led to widespread defaults, now has so much bad debt on its books that it may have to tighten up its loan modification service.

Home Loan Modification allows defaulting borrowers to work out new terms with Countrywide, so that they can avoid foreclosure and stay on track. Countrywide began offering the service through their Home Retention Department at the height of last year’s real estate bubble. However, due to the volume of requests coming in, many cases were delayed and resulted in foreclosure. The company hit an all-time low in 2008 and was recently bought out by the Bank of America.

In line with the change, the Loan Modification Department of the Law Offices of Marc R. Tow is also taking measures to protect its clients. The firm, one of the leading loan modification services in the country, will only negotiate modifications with Countrywide for clients with viable cases and those who are in serious financial trouble. Changes are also expected in national Loan Modification policies. While loan modification is still open to borrowers not in default, new laws may soon limit the service only to those in bankruptcy or serious delinquency. This will allow lenders and loan modification companies to focus their attention to clients who are most in need. The firm will continue to help clients with loans serviced by other companies. Besides loan modification, the Law Offices of Marc R. Tow also offers assistance with loss mitigation alternatives such as short sales.

Foreclosure Tax Sales, Loan Modification, Delaying A Sheriff Sale, And More

Foreclosure Tax Sales, Loan Modification, Delaying A Sheriff Sale, And More

Foreclosures for unpaid property taxes vary widely by state and county. Sometimes the house is auctioned off to satisfy the taxes. Other times, a lien or certificate is sold to the high bidder. And in some areas, no sale is conducted and the property is simply transferred from the homeowner to the county or other tax agency. In most jurisdictions, homeowners have the right to redeem their property after the auction for delinquent taxes.

The following are some defenses homeowners can still raise after a sheriff sale to delay or challenge the foreclosure process and auction:

* Irregularity in conducting the sale
* Sale price at auction was grossly inadequate
* Homeowners did not receive notice as required
* Sheriff sale was not advertised as required

Any physical problems with a property make proceeding with a foreclosure much less desirable for lenders. An appraisal, Broker’s Price Opinion, or other type of valuation from a trustworthy source should be included with any workout proposal, loan modification, or short sale request homeowners make if there are deficiencies in the condition of the house.

If borrowers run into a brick wall dealing with the mortgage servicing company, they can go a step above and contact the holder of the loan. Large banks, institutional lenders, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac, among others, will often push a servicer to intervene and work out a solution with homeowners to stop foreclosure, modify a loan, or delay a sheriff sale.

Most people think that Wall Street was primarily responsible for securitizing junk loans and unleashing the subprime crisis. In reality, though, over 50% of mortgage securitizations are guaranteed or issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (two government-sponsored enterprises), or Ginnie Mae (Government National Mortgage Association).

In a mortgage modification or other workout agreement, it is always easier to negotiate down interest charges, late fees, and other unexpended costs to the lender. These are costs the lender has not paid out of pocket, but has instead just tacked onto the loan balance. They can and should be negotiated away.

According to the Truth in Lending Act, homeowners can request their mortgage servicer to identify for them the person or company or organization that holds the mortgage. The servicer must comply with this request.

Sometimes homeowners are able to delay a sheriff sale over and over again. While this seems a little counter-intuitive, if the lender does not accept the request for a postponement, it may face liability for acting in bad faith. Pursuing foreclosure and using the courts is usually considered the last option, and if the owners are working on a mortgage modification or short sale, for instance, the county auction can be called off relatively easily.